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Streetswings Dance History Archives: Tango
Tango Dancer doing the 'Dip'  
Tango Argentino Title

   Buenos Aires (Argentina) was founded by a Spanish expedition in 1536, then again in 1580. Immigration brought many French, Spanish and Italians to Buenos Aires as Buenos Aires went on to become a major city. In 1816 the Waltz was introduced to Argentina, then came the Polka, Mazurka and Schottische.

  Spanish and Cuban rhythms (guajira Flamenca and flamenco) mixed and the Habanera was born. The habanera came from Havana, Cuba and made its way thru Andalusa, Spain to Argentina in the early 19th century. The Habanera, Andalusan and the Polka rhythms merged with a splice of Indian rhythms (3/8, 5/8, 6/8, 9/8) played a part in the Argentine dance known as the "Milonga." The Andalusan women would originally dance this dance with each other, usually as a solo dance.

   The Milonga originated as a song with a lively tempo. The tempo was quieted down and dance steps were added to it, making the Milonga the first known tango (but not yet named as such) and was very popular by mid 1840s. (Milonga's can be quite fast in tempo and are very popular today.) The name Tango came to be used sometime around 1860 or 1870, (but didn't really gain world wide notice till about 1900.)

   There have been writings of the African-Argentines adding some movement to the Milonga (Mondonga Tango,) however it is reported that they did this dance separately and not couple-up (similar to the Andalusian's) while the compaditos who danced with them brought this tango back to town and started adding it to their Milonga's and the two dances merged. These African-Argentines called the dance the Tango (most likely, the general public through those magazine/ newspaper writings of the time confused the Habanera with the Tango and with all the bad press of the time linked to these dances, started calling all versions "the tango" ... similar misnaming as to the Hustle.) There is some history of Spanish roots as well, with many times being called the Spanish Tango.

   Nobody really knows what the word "tango" means, but some suggest it to mean: a "closed place" or "reserved ground." Or it may be from the Portuguese word tangere (to touch!) There are also cities in Angola and Mali (Africa) named Tango!. Some say it is just the sound of the drum emitting "tan-go!" sound ... so wherever the word comes from, the tango was here to stay.

   The main musical instruments used were the Bandoneon and Guitar. The bandoneon was introduced to Argentina in the late 19th century from Germany and the guitar came from Spain. By the 1920's the tango (Argentine) was the only version left standing in Buenos Aires.

   The Castles are said to have introduced the Tango as a ballroom dance here in the United States, however it was most likely Maurice Mouvet with his "Tango American" or FRANCES DEMAREST AND JOSEPH C. SMITH. (some writings credit Smith.) Although Charles Durang had written about the Tango as far back as 1857 predating both. The violent knee-dipping and strenuous body-twisting that were originally associated with the American Tango were eventually removed. Rudolph Valentino would later confuse the public even more with his Apache Dance version of the dance (It has been reported, many times that Rudy, never knew the dance called the Tango, only the Apache.)

   The dancing public followed Mouvet and the Castles in their invention of dances and innovations, and they made a few, but the Tango was not one of them ... THEY ONLY ADDED VARIATIONS to the DANCE. Many variations of tangos have come and gone such as the Yale Tango (American), Newman Tango, Bresilien Tango, Castle's Open Tango, Maurice Tango, French Tango, Tango American, La Rumba and many more. These are basically just different styles or moves of the tango done by a performer trying to gain fame in their dansants and Teas as an innovator.

  
When the tango hit Paris (1912,) it became all the rage throughout the world!. In Paris, a Parisian dance Instructor named Robert, was said to have standardized the French version. Another offshoot of the tango which had alot of popularity in the early 1900's in France and the U.S. was the Apache dance which many people unmistakably called the Tango!. Carlos Gardel (1890-1935) is known to help make the Tango popular to the masses with his Tango compositions that made the dance accepted thru its music to the masses. Argentine Tango can still be danced at a few night clubs around town in the States and is still danced heavily in Buenos Aires today.

   The American and International Style tango (ballroom versions) has some similarities to the original but are very few and are a very subdued OR modified version of the original Argentine Tango!. This probably stems from the Ragtime era , the Apache and One Step (or Castle Walk ) merging and bastardizing the dance, as well as un-educated dance instructors of the time. A few of the better known teachers who wrote their dance treatise, would make note of the differences of the real (argentine) and One-Step versions being passed around as the original.

   Many people confused the One Step dance back in the day, as, many dance teachers, trying to cash in on the market, and not knowing the real (Argentine) tango, used the One Step as a base, just like the Castles (probably because of the Gaucho Walk in Tango.) Most of the teachers back then thought of the original tango as just a certain way to walk while doing the one-step, ("The Tango Walk"... Spanish, el Paseo; French, le Promenade) is used as a variety to figures as most dances back then were basic walking dances. They would describe the real Tango Step as; "the brushing or sweeping of the toe to the floor, which occurs in all figures of the Tango."

   The ridiculous looking Head Snaps one sees in "Today's ballroom dance versions" is a play on the history of the Gaucho (Cowboy) and his partner (they didn't smell to well,) thus portraying getting a whiff and quickly turning the head away!, these Head Snaps were in Durang's description of the tango in 1857. The Ballroom Tango (today) along with East Coast Swing and Jive were bastardized versions of their originals, However, they were sold to the public as the real thing ... en masse!.

Notes: in 1925 Mr. Scott Atkinson and Dorothy Cole won the "World Tango Championships." In 1913 the "Tango-Visite" was introduced, which was a dress style for dancing with a transparent bodice and a mid-calf skirt length (Vanity Fair Magazine).

 

Birth Place

Creation Date

Creator

Dance Type

Andalusia, Spain 1850's n/a Ballroom
(refined in Argentina)      
 

Books About the Tango

Sheet Music Covers

Music Titles

$ 1991 - Argentine Tango as Social History 1897 - El Entreriano 1894 - El Talar
$ 1995 - Tango and the Political Economy of Passion 1913 - Hacienda Tango 1897 - El Entreriano
1913 - La Mode Tango 1912 - Gliding Girl, The (sousa)
$ 1997 - El Tango (The Dinzels) 1913 - Maurice's Irritable 1912 - Sparko Tango
$ 1997 - The Dance, The Song, Story Jalousie 1914 - At That Rueben Tango Hsukin Bee
$ 1998 - Quick start to Tango 1914 - Flor de Brazil 5 to 7 Tango
$ 2000 - Tango (The Dinzels) 1914 - More Cider Tango $ El Choclo
$ 2001 - Tango 1914 - Million Dollar Tango Ball Hernando's Hide-away (AM.)
  1914 - Brazilian Maxixe Innovation, The

Posters, Lobby Cards etc.

1917 - Mi Noche Triste $ La Cumparsita
Ardent Tango Alma de Bohemio La Rumba
Assassination Tango El Choclo No Other Love (AM)
Down Argentine Way Irish Tango Por una Cabeza
Forever Tango La B'risa Seguidilla's Y Tango (Arrieta)
Les Apaches des Paris La Cumprasita Tango (ALBÉNIZ)
Put Your Red Shoes On La Rumba 1800s - Tangos for Pianos
Tango Argentina La Vida d'Ellos $ Best Tango Album in the World Ever
Tango in Red Lagrmas $ La Revancha del Tango (Gotan)
    Maori Tango  
  Maurice Tango  
  Soy Tremendo!  
  Tango Crillo  
  The Argentine  
  Y Como le Va  
     
 

Night Clubs

Theaters

Locations

Astor Roof (N.Y.) Lyric Theater (Zarzuela) Chili
Bustanoby's Cafe (N.Y.) Colonial Theater (Ziegfeld) Corrientes Street &
Reconquista Street (BA)
El Tambo (BA)      
Hansens (BA)       England
La Vasca (BA)       France
Lauras (BA)       Havana, Cuba
San Martin Dance Hall (BA)       Uruguay, Spain and Peru
Scudo de Italia (BA)       USA
Stella de Italia (BA)        
(BA= Buenos Aires)

Publications

Instructional Videos / DVD's

Ballets / Stage

1900s - Caras y Caretas $ Copes Tango Copes 10/26/1914 - Ziegfeld
1/22/1973 - Time Magazine $ Tango Fundamentals 1: Basic
1914 - The Golden Crook (Imperial Tango Dancers)
2/1973 - Playboy Magazine $ Tango Magic (Beg) 1/19/1923 - Actors Fund Annual Benefit
3/1989 - Smithsonian Magazine $ Tango the Embrace 1 1955 - the Boyfriend
Tanguera Magazine $ Tango the Heart 2 1987 - Tango Argentino
  $ Tango the Soul 3 1993 - El Patio de la Morocha
  $ Tango the Seduction 4 1994 - Forever Tango (Clip)
  Tango The: [DVD1 | DVD2 | DVD3] 1994 - Gotán
  $ Tango with Federico DVD George Bizet's"Carmen"
  $ You Can Dance Tango  
     
n/a

Films / Movies -- Various Tango dance and related

Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1910 - BeBe Apache Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1936 - Tango (Prevost) Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1998 - Tango of Yearning (Arab)
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1913 - Dancing Lessons (Kalem) Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1942 - Arres de Andalucia ? Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1998 - Tango: The Obsession [DVD]
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1914 - Tango Tangles (Chaplin)
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
1946 - Razors Edge, the Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1999 - Tango [DVD]
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1914 - Whirl of Life (Castles)
1959 - Some Like It Hot (Tango Scene) - Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
1959 - Some Like It Hot (Tango Scene) Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1999 - Tango Passion [DVD]
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1916 - The Tango Queen
2006 - Take The Lead - Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
1963 - Tango Course, the
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
2001 - Moulin Rouge (Roxanne)
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1917 - Cleopatra (song) Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1964 - Notas Andaluzas Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 2002 - Assassination Tango [DVD]
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1918 - Lydia (Song) Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1969 - Tango Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 2002 - Tango Kabaree
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1922 - la Muchacha del Arrabal Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1972 - Last Tango in Paris [DVD] Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 2002 - Tangos fly
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1920s - La Vendedora de Harrods Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1974 - Last Tango In Acapulco, the
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
2004 - Shall We Dance (Gear and Lopez)
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1921 - Cheat, the (Song) Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1979 - Tango (Cedron Doc.)
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
2008 - Another Cinderella Story
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1921 - Four Horsemen of Apocalypse [DVD] Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1981 - Danzón? [DVD]
2006 - Take The Lead - Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
2006 - Take The Lead
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1921 - My Boy (Song) Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1983 - Tango [DVD]
2007 - Mr. and Mrs. Smith - Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
2007 - Mr. and Mrs. Smith
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1921 - Sheik, the [DVD] Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1985 - Tango's l'exil de Gardel
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
2008 - Easy Virtue
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1926 - Sea Wolf, the (Song) Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1987 - Tango Bayle nuestro
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
2010 - Street Dance 2
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1931 - Tango (Argentina) Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1987 - Tango: Our Dance [DVD] Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. Happy Together
1933 - Tango - Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
1933 - Tango (Skouboe) Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1988 - Tango Bar [DVD] (Raul Julia)
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
Shakira - Objection Tango
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1934 - Cuesta Abajo [DVD] Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1988 - Tango l'exile de Gardel Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. Tango 5
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1934 - El Tango en Broadway [DVD] Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1988 - Tango our dance [DVD] (Tango: Baile Nuestro)
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
Roxy Hart (Cell Block Tango)
1934 - Tango Bar - Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
1934 - Tango Bar Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1991 - Naked Tango Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.

Television

Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1935 - El Día Que Me Quieras [DVD]
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
1992 - Scent of a Woman [DVD]
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
Marcel Marceau - The Tango Dancer (1986?)
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1935 - Tango Bar (Gardel) [DVD] Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1992 - Tango Argentino
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
Nescafe Tango Commercial
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1936 - Loco Lindo (Song)
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
1993 - Addams Family Values
1993 - Addams Family Values - Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
Shakira Pepsi Tango Commercial
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 19?? - Melodia de Arrabal [DVD]
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
1994 - True Lies
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
Toyota Corolla Tango Commercial
Victor Sylvestor doing the Tango - Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
Victor Sylvestor doing the Tango's (late 1920's)
The Tango Lesson - Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
1997 - Tango Lesson, the [DVD]
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
Volkswagon Tango Commercial
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 19?? - Mercado del Abasto [DVD] Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1998 - Tango Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.

Music Videos

Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window. 1936 - Ayúdame a Vivir    
Viewable thru a Youtube Video Pop-up window.
Shakira - Objection Tango
$ CITA 2000 - The best of the performances by the Dance Masters of Argentine Tango [DVD]
 

Dancers, Choreographers etc. ... Tangueros

1913 - Natha & Peters (La Mode) Joseph Santley Spanish Tango Dancers
1914 - Vera Michelena Imperial Tango Dancers (1914)
1914 - Ann Pennington (Zgfld) La Modonquito
Marie Hill and Floyd Keich La Parda Refucilo
1921 - Beatrice Dominguez (4 horsemen) Lew Quinn (La Rumba)
1925 - Dorothy Cole & Scott Atkinson Louise Alexander
Bruce Willis (1980's :) Maurice & Walton
Carmecita Calderon Natacha Rambova
Cyril Pauley and Blanche Young Pepa La Chata
Dabney Pepita
El Flaco Saul Raul Julia (actor)
George Raft Robert Duvall (actor 1990's)
Gladys Sears and Her Tango Girls (1914) Rosita & Ramon Veijo Tanguero
Jaun Carlos Copes & Maria Nieves Rubia Mireya (Margarita Verdier) Vern & Irene Castle
Joan Sawyer Rudolph Valentino Vlad ? (Vlad Tango)
Jose Ovidio Bianquet (el Cachafaz) The Dinzels (1980s)  
     

Other Related Dances of the time...

Political

Apache Dance Horsetrot Julio Argentino Roca (1843 - 1914)
Andalusan Lame Duck  
Brazilian Maxixe Maxixe  
Breakaway Milonga  
Bunny Hug One Step  
Camel Walk Peabody  
Castle Glide Spanish Dance

Newspaper Publications

Castle Walk Tango Maurice 1/18/1915 - Gazette and Bulletin (Tango standardize now called Opera Tango)
Charleston Texas Tommy 4/17/1922 - Davenport Democrat and Leader (Plesiosaurian Glide)
Fado Three Step  
Foxtrot Turkey Trot  
Grizzly Bear Two Step  
Habanara Waltz  
   

Tango Dances over time...

Magazine Subscriptions

American Tango International Style (English) $Tango Reporter Magazine
Andalusan Tango La Mode Tango Tango Reporter Magazine (Spanish)
Argentine Tango Opera Tango (1915)
Ballroom Tango (Am & I'tl) Plesiosaurian Glide (from Buenos Aires 1922)
Brazilian Maxixe Santley Tango
Castle Tango Tango Liso (smooth tango)
Dongozo Tango Tango Maxixe
Finish Tango Tango Nuevo (aka Nuevo Tango)
French Tango (Regular Tango) Tango Trigacio
Habanera Uruguayan tango  
Innovation Tango Yale (American)  

Books, Magazine Articles on the dance...

Title

Author

Date

Publisher

The Ballroom Casket Durang, Charles 1857 n/a
American Dancing Master & Ballroom Prompter Howe, Elias 1862 E.Howe
(Don't have the cover-sorry) Lynch, Ventura 1883 ?
Dances of Today Newman, Albert 1913 n/a
Toronto Sunday World Newspaper   4/12/1914 ??
Social Dances of Today Kinney, Troy 1914 n/a
The Tango and Other Up-To-Date Dances Hopkins, J.S. 1914 Saalfield Pub.
The Tango and new Ballroom dances Mouvet, Maurice 1914 Laird and Lee
Modern Dances and How to Dance Them Walker, Caroline 1914 Saul Brothers
Dance Magazine (1912 Jardin de Danse) ?? 11/1960 ??
$ Disco to Tango and Back Blair, Skippy 1978 n/a
Dancing Till Dawn Malnig, Julie 1992 N.Y. University Press
Tango! Collier, Simon 1995 Thames & Hudson, LTD

Musicians

Singers

Poets / Writers

Albeniz, Isaac (18601909) Francisco Canaro Jose Hernandez
Brymn, J. Tim Sebastian Ramos Meija Leopoldo Lugones
Casimiro, El Negro      
Filiberto, Juan de Dios      
Firpo, Roberto      
Gardel, Carlos (18901935) (El Zorzal Criollo)      
Mendizabal, Rosendo    

Links

Piazzolla, Astor     a passion for tango
Pardo, El (The Mulatto)     Origin of Bataclan
Arrieta, Juan Emilio (18231894)      
Sinforoso, El Mulatto      
Sousa, John Phillip (18541932)      
YRADIER, Sebastián de (18091865)      

Misc. Research Words that may be related ... to help your searches

Academias (Studios) Contradanza Periqundines (Clubs,Cafes etc.)
Arrabales Cortes (kor-tay) Quebradas
Araucanian Indians Gauchos (Cowboy) Sainetes
Bandoneon (Accordion) Guitar Shak dansu (Tokyo)
Barrios (Ghetto) Lengue (neckerchief) Squeezebox
Caudillos Medialuna (half moon) Tangana
Clandestinos Pampa Zarzuela
Compadre Payadores (Folk Singers) Empañadas

Other...[Durang's Head Snaps page | Pictures ]

Historic Basic Step:
From: Argentine Tango - 1914, Book (USA Version) Excerpted from J.S. Hopkins. (this is not the same Argentine tango done today)
Step One:
(Gentleman walking backwards, commencing with left foot, lady forward, with right.)
Seven steps counted 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, the eighth step or count being called the Change Weight Step.
Step on right foot, count 8, and change weight and step on left foot.
Counterpart for lady. During counts 7 and 8 gentleman turns to right of partner and faces forward, retaining original position, this
bringing the arms in rear. At the start of the turn in the Tango.
Step Two:
Both lady and gentleman walk forward, lady with left foot, gentleman with right in the same line of direction.
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Change step. Gentleman steps on left, count and change weight and step on right. Count 8.
Counterpart for lady.
During counts 7, 8, the lady changes to opposite side of partner, turning around in front, bringing outstretched
arms in front.
Step Three:
Both point outside foot in front, 1. Transfer weight to foot pointed, 2. Step forward with inside foot, 3. Both
step forward with outside foot, count and close the inside foot to meet outside, 4. Repeat the preceding four
counts, 1, 2, 3 and 4.
Step Four:
Both walk forward with outside foot, 1. Forward inside foot, 2 (leaving outside foot pointed in rear). Make
outward circle and with outside foot bring to front, 3, 4. Do not change weight. Repeat these four steps.
Step Five:
Both lady and gentleman turn in opposite direction and step across the inside foot with the outside foot,
walk three steps, 1, 2, 3. Both point the inside foot to side, and while doing so pull outside foot toward it,
but do not close. At same time turn body to opposite direction, count 4. With outside foot or pointed one
walk across outside one three steps, 1, 2, 3, taking same movement as before, on 4, turning to position,
count 4.
Step Six:
This step is a repetition of Step Five, so it will not be necessary to describe it, only to say that instead of
stepping across with outside foot, you step with inside foot across, just reversing the movement. Both of
these steps take four measures of music to complete. On last counts of 3 and 4, do not turn body in
opposite direction.
Step Seven:
Both walk forward with outside foot in line of direction, 1, 2. Gentleman steps around in front on opposite
side of partner with outside foot, changing from left to right side, count 3. Lady steps forward but does not
turn. Both forward, for count 4. Repeat. Counts 1, 2, on 3 lady turns around partner, back to original position.
Step Eight:
This step is a repetition of Step Seven, which completes dance. In taking turns around partner,
do not disengage hands. You will find this a most effective step.

Step Descriptions from Albert Newman's Book in 1913 (paraphrased):
This is perhaps the most difficult Tango, and consists of the thirteen steps described here, the Spanish and French names being given. These steps are executed in the order that pleases the gentleman, repeating each as often as he wishes:
(1) El Paseo (la promenade), (2) El Marcha (la marche), (3) El Media Corte (le demi coupé), (4) El Corte (le coupé), (5) La Media Luna (la demi-une), (6) El Chassé (la chassé), (7) El Cruzado (les croises), (8) El Ocho-Argentino (le huit argentin), (9) El Rueda (la roue), (10) El Frottado (le frotté), (11) El Abanico (léventail), (12) El Molinette (le moulinet), (13) El Vigne.
El Paseo: is a slow walk, consisting of one step to each measure.
El Marcha: is a walk taking two steps to one measure or a step to each beat. El Paseo and El Marcha are often performed together.
El Media Corte: and El Corte are stop steps and closely related. El Corte is described in the Parisienne Tango.
La Media Luna: is a combination of the first two beats of Media Corte for the man and the last two beats for the lady.
El Chas: is a step forward on inside foot (1), and a Two-Step (2) (x) and a step forward on outside foot (3). The rhythm is rather puzzling, but should not confuse the pupil. This step is repeated.
El Cruzado: is the Scissors Step (Las Tijeras or Le Ciseaux); it is similar to a Pas de Bourrée. There is a one-step Cruzado and a three-step.
El Ocho Argentino: (the argentine eight) is also called a Cross Step. color=Foot pattern draws figure 8.
El Rueda: (the wheel).
El Frottado: literally rubbing or polishing, is so named from the similarity of the step to the action of polishing the floor.
El Abanico: (the fan) is very similar to the Ocho Argentino.
El Molinette: (the mill).
La Vigne: (the grape vine) crossing one foot over the other.
He goes on to state: "Argentine Tango is more intended for professional use and can hardly be found practical for the ballroom" La Leçon de tango

February 11, 2013
http://www.Streetswing.com/histmain/index.htm
Assination Tango with Robert Duvall 1983 'Tango' Film 1972 - The Last Tango in Paris 1997 - The Tango Lesson n/a 1997 - Tang: Our Dance
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